Swiping a Priceless Antiquity … With a Scanner and a 3-D Printer

Swiping a Priceless Antiquity … With a Scanner and a 3-D Printer

When artists share the scanned data from a priceless statue so others can reproduce the item, what are the social, economic, legal and cultural ramifications? Does this change the value society places on antiquities?  Share your thoughts after reading the article.

museumshack video of artist scanning bust at musuem

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Five Chinese Dissident Artists Who Aren’t Ai Weiwei

Five Chinese Dissident Artists Who Aren’t Ai Weiwei

In a world of words, pictures still matter

In a world of words, pictures still matter

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Photojournalism has been declared dead. But as the response to the refugee crisis shows, images still have impact

“Photography is an evolving visual language. In reportage it delivers comedy and satire as well as tragedy. Why are some photographs of quiet scenes of everyday life so memorable? Yet at least three of our national newspapers have, reportedly, no staff photographers at all.

Last week the documentary photographer and film director Anton Corbijn was said to be leaving professional photography. The Economist, in a gloomy piece on Corbijn’s Berlin retrospective, declared: “Photography as a slow analogue art form is dead.” In fact, film-based photography has been enjoying a recent revival with new manufacturers coming on to the market.

What’s changed over the years is functionality and availability. Today, almost everyone has a way of taking pictures. That’s not the issue. Amateurs engaging with photography should be welcomed, not feared. The crisis that has faced photography has often been blamed on “the other” – the market, amateurs, journalists with iPhones – never on its own lack of purpose or imagination.”

Richard Prince, Inc.

Controversial artist Richard Prince sued for copyright infringement

“Richard Prince, a New York-based artist whose work often involves appropriating that of others, has been sued for copyright infringement by Donald Graham, a photographer who claims Prince knowingly reproduced his photo Rastafarian Smoking a Joint without seeking permission.

Artnet reports that Graham filed a complaint on 30 December against Prince, the Gagosian Gallery – where Prince’s New Portraits exhibition ran between September and October 2014 – and Lawrence Gagosian, the gallery owner.

The New Portraits collection featured 37 inkjet prints on canvas of what Prince called “screen saves” of Instagram posts, according to the complaint. The only modification to the images by Prince, besides blowing them up in size, are in comments underneath the pictures comprised of emojis and bizarre sentences. The pieces sold for up to $100,000 at New York’s Frieze art fair, where they caused considerable controversy.”

Richard Prince, Inc.

The Art of Art Lawsuits

The Art of Art Lawsuits

Reuters Issues a Worldwide Ban on RAW Photos

Reuters Issues a Worldwide Ban on RAW Photos

“Reuters has implemented a new worldwide policy for freelance photographers that bans photos that were processed from RAW files. Photographers must now only send photos that were originally saved to their cameras as JPEGs.”

See the Mag Zendaya Just Majorly Called Out for Photoshopping Her Body

See the Mag Zendaya Just Majorly Called Out for Photoshopping Her Body

Rock Against Racism – how an artistic movement took on the National Front

Rock Against Racism – how an artistic movement took on the National Front

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Kids of The Past vs. Kids of The Internet Generation

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Kids of The Past vs. Kids of The Internet Generation

Interview: Michael Kamber on Photojournalism Ethics and the Altering of Images

Interview: Michael Kamber on Photojournalism Ethics and the Altering of Images

“Recently, he took the initiative to create an exhibition at the Bronx Documentary Center titled Altered Images, which focuses on exposing documentary photography that has been staged, manipulated, or faked. We spoke to him to learn more about the current state of ethics in photojournalism and where things are headed.”

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The enclosed is an image that will be the subject of the Bronx Documentary Center's upcoming exhibition Altered Images: 150 Years of Posed and Manipulated Documentary Photography as well as other related programming. The BDC makes no representations nor extends any rights as to use of this image by another party. Basra, Iraq March 30, 2003 Photo by Brian Walski Representation: The photograph, taken in the earliest days of the Iraq invasion, shows a British soldier warning a group of Iraqi civilians to take cover from nearby fire. First published on the cover page of the Los Angeles Times, the image also ran in the Chicago Tribune and the Hartford Courant. Reality: The photo is a composite of two images taken seconds apart.  After the Hartford Courant published the image, a Courant employee noticed a duplication of civilians in the background. The Los Angeles Times confronted Walski, who confessed to having digitally merged the two photographs to improve the composition.  Walski was immediately fired for violating the newspaper's code of ethics. In an apology to the TImes, Walski said:

The enclosed is an image that will be the subject of the Bronx Documentary Center’s upcoming exhibition Altered Images: 150 Years of Posed and Manipulated Documentary Photography as well as other related programming. The BDC makes no representations nor extends any rights as to use of this image by another party.
Basra, Iraq
March 30, 2003
Photo by Brian Walski
Representation: The photograph, taken in the earliest days of the Iraq invasion, shows a British soldier warning a group of Iraqi civilians to take cover from nearby fire. First published on the cover page of the Los Angeles Times, the image also ran in the Chicago Tribune and the Hartford Courant.
Reality: The photo is a composite of two images taken seconds apart. After the Hartford Courant published the image, a Courant employee noticed a duplication of civilians in the background. The Los Angeles Times confronted Walski, who confessed to having digitally merged the two photographs to improve the composition.
Walski was immediately fired for violating the newspaper’s code of ethics. In an apology to the TImes, Walski said: “I have always maintained the highest ethical standards throughout my career and cannot truly explain my complete breakdown in judgment at this time.”